By Brian Winter BELO HORIZONTE Brazil (Reuters) - He remains the one true rock star of Brazilian politics, introduced to an adoring crowd of thousands over the weekend as "our eternal president." Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, 68, is back on the campaign trail after a brief hiatus, hoping that a burst of his signature charisma and rapport with the poor will be enough to push his chosen successor, President Dilma Rousseff, to a re-election victory in a closely fought runoff vote on Sunday. ...
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President Barack Obama and Rep. Gary Peters, D-Mich. stop for lunch at Zingerman's Delicatessen in Ann Arbor, Mich., April 2, 2014.

President Barack Obama and Rep. Gary Peters, D-Mich. stop for lunch at Zingerman's Delicatessen in Ann Arbor, Mich., April 2, 2014.

(Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

My partner, Ari Weinzweig, and I never subscribed to the conservative economic theory of Milton Friedman, that “the business of business is business.” To us, the right to conduct business is earned by being a good corporate citizen — by producing products and delivering services responsibly, hiring responsibly, generating profits responsibly, and finally, sharing profits with those who help produce them and with the wider community from which the revenues are drawn.

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Brazil's presidential candidate Dilma Rousseff of Workers Party gestures during a debate in a TV studio in Sao PauloBy Anthony Boadle BRASILIA (Reuters) - Opposition candidate Aecio Neves is heading into the final week of Brazil's presidential race with a razor-thin lead in polls, but it's the incumbent Dilma Rousseff who appears to be gaining momentum in the homestretch. After a sudden surge before and after the first-round vote on Oct. 5, Neves is struggling to retain the momentum that gave him a slight advantage in recent polling. He leads Rousseff by 2 percentage points in the most closely watched opinion polls, within their margin of error. ...

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